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day a meteorite makes impact with earth in russia. what's really going on here? i came to nasa goddard to find out and get some real answers. >> today the day of an amazing cosmic coincidence. >> the close call happened earlier this afternoon. an astroid called 2012 da14 whizzed pasted earth at about 17 thousands miles per hour. nasa scientists believe da14 was once part of the astroid belt between mars and jupiter and is a remnant of our ancient solar system. the astroid passed under the orbit of some of our weather satellites. it's captivated attention of people at goddard and around the world. we had about 17,000 miles of breathing room from its closest point above the indian ocean and it was about 2,000 miles or so from the nearest satellite orbiting earth. >> space is a really big place, so it's still mostly empty. >> reporter: the approach of da14 may be news to us, but nasa has known about it for a year. it's the meteor that slammed into russia earlier this morning that took them completely by surprise. it's a calculated risk nasa took when they first started studying outer spa
, congress directed the federal agencies including the faa and nasa collaborating in accelerating the integration of uas into the national air space. the faa modernization and reform act of 2012 contains provisions designed to promote and facilitate the use of civilian unmanned aircraft. we, on the subcommittee, know that you've been working hard and have made progress towards meeting the prescribed objectives, but we also know that there are many unresolved issues, both technologically and regulatorily. again, i go to the goal today to have the research to overcome technology issues and mitigate risk involved with uas integration into the national air space system. we're particularly interested in hearing about any advances towards eliminating as a as a vulnerabilities. the agreements on technological standards and the "washington post" reported nine american uas crashes occurred near civilian airports overseas as a result of pilot ere -- error. there's poor coordination with air traffic controllers. in august 2010, the "new york times" reported that a navy uas violated air space
of them hurt by falling glass. nasa saying the meteor was about 50 feet and impact may have been 30 times stronger than the atomic bomb that hit hiroshima. drivers are searching a frozen lake, this one near where it landed. 20,000 searchers looking for remains of the meteor but so far they haven't found any. >> kelly: we have to check this out. an amazing video, an unrelated asteroid flying past earth, this one was much bigger and could have been more dangerous. it doesn't look so bad within safe within our atmosphere but this nasa of an makes shows the path of 150 foot asteroid. it came within 17,000 miles of earth's surface and something so large has come to our planet. scientists have been keeping a very close eye on this one, but there are a lot -- they have never seen them coming this big. >> heather: here to add to that, a mysterious sighting, this one even closer to home. reports of a bright light flashing through the sky, this was in northern california. >> kelly: look at that. >> heather: you can see flying by on the right hand corner of your screen, witnesses saying it looked li
in the integration. last year congress directed the federal agent fees, including the faa and nasa collaborated in accelerating integration into the national airspace. the faa modernization and reform act of 2012 can tames provision designed to promote and facilitate use of civilian unmanned aircraft. we have a subcommittee know you've been working hard and it made progress towards meeting the prescribed object days, but we also know there are many unresolved issues, both technologically and regulatory lead. again, our goal today is to better understand the research underway to overcome technological issues and mitigate risk involved with uas integration into the national airspace system. we are particularly interested in hearing about any advances towards eliminating vulnerabilities in command and control communications. new capabilities in and agreements on technological standards. the "washington post" recently reported that he sent american crashes occurred near civilian airports overseas as a result of pilot error. mechanical failure, poor coordination of air traffic controllers. in august
if the weather holds later today. nasa will launch first observing satellite into orbit. coming up a nasa scientist will join us live. good morning i'm tony perkins. >> and i'm allison seymour. happy you are with us on this monday morning. we know it's a little wet out there. tucker barnes is here to tell you when it's going to dry up. >> and most of the rain is out of here. not going to be a beautiful looking day. >> might get sun later. >> maybe a little sun. a few weaks of sun. today is not promising but tomorrow is. >> isn't that always the way, tuck? >> the sun will come out. rain showers to the east. we're generally done with the rain. not going to be a great looking day. the clouds are going to hold tough. a peak or two or sunshine. temperatures going to warm well into the 50s. should be even a little milder than what we had around here this weekend. temperature at reagan national 39. 39 dulles. bwi marhsall 38. these temperatures should jump 15 degrees or so by the afternoon. a little sun developing early afternoon. highs in the mid 50s around here. may do a 60 or so to our south.
to make a close fly by of planet earth. but nasa says there's no chance the 150-foot astroid will hit us. at the closest point it will be 17,000 miles from earth, and that's closer than weather and tv satellites that are in orbit. we're giving you mixed messages there. we're saying it's not far, but it's closer than weather and tv satellites. okay. greg was in here, and i was happy to hear his explanation of things. >> he says we don't have to worry about it. in the meantime, do we have to worry about the weather? here's tucker barnes with the answer. >>> potentially so. thank you very much. not this morning. lots of sunshine. cool start to the day. later this afternoon, rain showers move in for the evening commute and might transition to snow later tonight. a lot going on weather-wise. 37 now at reagan national. 34 this morning dulles. bwi marshall 33 degrees. make sure the kids are bundled up. we're not concerned with rain and/or snow the first half of the day. satellite radar, generally sunny skies the first half of your day. clouds will quickly increase. late this afternoon, see the
. nasa reporting it appeared brighter than the sun. traveling at around 40,000 miles an hour, fast enough that if you were to hitch a ride, it would get from you new york to l.a. in four minutes time flat. early estimates were it weighed ten tons. nasa says now more like 7,000. it ripped through the air like a blade through fabric triggering sonic booms and an immense shock wave when it exploded. when it shattered miles above the earth, we're told it released 20 times the energy, more powerful than the hiroshimo bomb in japan. it was powerful enough to knock down doors and shatter windows across one city. officials say more than 1,000 people went for medical treatment. flying glass blamed for most of those injuries. one witness saying when older women in the neighborhood spotted it, they started screaming that the world was ending. and just about everybody seemed a little freaked out. >> it was very confusing because the building was shaking a little bit, so initially i thought it was an earthquake. but then i knew i heard this loud bang, so i thought some sort of explosion, either a gas
. 3 3 3 3 news."" 3 3&pand cooinggup in just 30 minntts... nasa has their eye maryland prepaaed for a clooee tonight?branni proctor has our & traffii edge reporr. report. 3mapsgreenssringliberty 3 shawanmap395 &&p3 an olympic runner... acccsed -33 offkilling his girlfriend... p33 what hees saying about he murder.. and thh evidence revealed in couut. 3 &pthe plumminggobviously was the -3&pbiggesttissse, and the smell ///butt to///bbings a whole new meaning to the term poop eck. peck. 3 the cruise ssip nightmare is pver... what passengers are saaing about the horrible conditions they enddred... and the first thing mann of hem - ddd on dry land. & 3---explosion ats--- 3 an explosion nocks -firrfightees off their feet .. whattcaused this massive pireeall. 33 - 3 --adblib weetteertz-- 3- the triumph... is on the move...//.just hours ...after... t wws pulled pnto... mobile bay.../, the.... cruise shii... headed in... for reeairs today....//rene marrh... has the... thousands of passennerss ... h
. bill: according to nasa, 100 tons of meet toors of gravel and dust hit the atmosphere and the earth every single day. the smaller strikes what we saw in russia happen ten times a year. that's new. scientists believe a strike by a meteor six miles across may have been responsible for extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. in case you're wondering on a friday have something to do over the weekend you mentioned the asteroid talking about past several days. they say there is no connection between that and this meteor. we'll talk to scientists throughout the morning. heather: a lot of experts. bill: meantime, six minutes past, the nightmare is finally over. what a slow crawl this was. thousands of passengers cheering the end of a cruise ship horror scene. touching land and kissing it like the pope. the carnival cruise triumph docking last night in mobile after putting what passengers through what they call disgusting conditions. now they say they are just happy to be home. who can blame them. >> i feel great to be off the ship and just being on land and, i get to see my family
this afternoon around 2:25 eastern. nasa didn't know about the astroid until a year ago when an amateur astronomer just happened to spot it in our skies. but it seems a remote part of russia did get a visitor from space. at least one meteorite streaked across the sky this morning triggering powerful shockwaves. witnesses say the noise set off car alarms and broke windows and damaged a factory. at least 250 people were hurt, mostly cuts from broken glass. thousands of russian troops were put on alert. >> apparently according to the latest information we have, 20,000 first responders are being sent to the scene, three aircraft surveying the damage from the scene. again, all those folks injured from the broken glass of all the stuff that shattered during the collision. >> and it's cold there, so the people with shattered windows are in the freezing cold. so a lot going on. >>> now let's check our weather. mountain snow in the central rockies. showers from tennessee to southern illinois. heavy rain from orlando southward. snow around the great lakes and northern new england. >>> mostly 50s
. joining us now to talk all about this is our sky guy greg redfern, nasa ambassador. so we booked you to come in -- >> little did we know. >> you guys are good, top of the news. >> real good, man. how's the stock market going to do? >> we'll see. i thought the mayanna calendar was -- >> child's play. >> all right, greg, let's talk about this event. most people are just hearing about it. >> boy. >> a meteor, how big do we think it was? >> well, the latest news report said that this was probably about 10 tons and i'm thinking it's probably the size of a big suv, came in the atmosphere, they were figuring about 33,000 miles an hour and it exploded at about 18 to 20 miles or so above the earth's atmosphere. this is incredible video, incredible. so you're seeing the fireball, ball like coming in. >> it's essentially melting as it's coming into the atmosphere? >> it's blading, it's coming in, it's leaving all of this material, the earth's atmosphere, it's causing friction, it's making its surface a blade away, it's building up this shock wave in front of it and the fireball can't withstand
of collisions. >> reporter: aware, but how well is the world prepared? nasa budgeted $20 million last year to look for objects that may hit the earth but some scientists say more money should be spent on detection and ways to avoid a possible collision. >> we've gotten very good at finding the big things, the kilometer sized objects. we're working down to smaller objects. but there's many more of the small objects like these than there are of the big ones. >> i'd say the appropriate technology for deflecting a dangerous asteroid could possibly be a nuclear bomb, but the key is catching and detecting the objects early. >> reporter: experts say that friday's blast could have killed thousands of people had the meteor landed in the middle of a large city, a reminder they say that even smaller objects threatening earth should be a wake-up call. >> we knew factually we lived in a celestial falling rock zone, but friday taught us, reminded us that we live in a shooting gallery, in fact, we got into a crossfire. >> reporter: the power of the universe on display here on earth. michelle franzen, nbc
this area is so cold. nasa estimates the meteor exploded with the force of at least 20 hiroshima atomic bombs. >> if this amount of energy had been detonated at ground level, instead of ten miles up, it would have probably leveled a -- every single building in an area the size of chicago. >> reporter: local officials say the explosion injured more than 1,000 people and caused about $33 million in damage. cameras captured the meteor in the sky over russia. now crews are trying to find fragments in a lake about 50 miles from the town. scientists say an event of this magnitude happens about once every hundred years but they say it's not uncommon for meteors to impact the planet more often. >> we are hit by about 100 tons of space debris every day. >> reporter: the explosion in russia and an asteroid that just missed earth has people looking up. late friday, some in the san francisco bay area reported seeing a fireball streaking through the sky. experts say it was likely another meteor. but the three events are unrelated. tatiana anderson for cbs news. >>> for thousands of passengers aboard
time in history, nasa gathers a rock sample from mars. the curiosity rover drilled a hole into a rock used its robotic arm this weekend. the rock is believed to be proof that there was once water on that planet. the rover will process the sample over the next few days. >>> the hottest dog show in the country picks off tomorrow. a dog from anne arundel county is competing in the westminster kennel club. tonight we meet blanket rocket ship. >> reporter: as he sits waiting for his last minute preb he's ready. >> he likes to -- prep he's ready. >> he likes to look good. >> yes he does. >> reporter: to take the westminster dog show by form. >> he has a lot of fun as a dog the day before because he's not allowed to sniff or play with dogs the next day. >> reporter: fluffy, 93 pound bermese mountain dog will be entered in the working dog group. this trip to new york is impressive. it is the first time westminster has allowed a non-champion to compete. >> we a super excited to be there. it's a long shot that he'll win. it's possible. anything is possible. but we have so excited just to be at
. this is a serious thing right? people say why doesn't nasa do something about it, and there are cool old political reasons. first of all, it wasn't part of nasa's charter it wasn't human space flight or science it's just cataloging objects that are scientifically understood, blah blah blah blah. we work hard to raise awareness of this, and so oh, we are maybe getting there. cenk: how much money do you think is needed to catalog it? >> it's a great question. there's two things we do wrong as c.e.o. of a non-profit. we don't ask for money and then we don't ask for enough. cenk: so fix it right now. don't be like a down sore, fix it. >> we can approach the problem in two ways, first to get the sentinel spacecraft flying, that's about $450 million. then between now and when that could possibly happen, it's about that much money and then after that, to go deflect one it's about that much money. cenk: we're talking about a billion. >> 1.5 billion. it's what the curious city rover cost. we might find something on mars that might dare i say it, change the world. cenk: bush said let's go drill on mars, it'
is a brilliant university of maryland graduate engineering student with ties to nasa. but he was also suffering from a mental illness that turned deadly. >> the whole thing -- >> shocked, neighboring students said bullets went through an suv window and into a neighborhood home. >> i guess -- >> find the trigger of a semihandgun was dayvon green. a 23-year-old university of maryland graduate engineering student and self-described brainiac, seen on a nasa website, where he was working on engineering. >> one of his roommates woke up to the flames. >> a bizarre night was lit fires all around the house which lured these roommates outside. green inexplicably pulled his gun from his waistband, shot one roommate to death and shot another. green ran in the backyard and shot hems. julie parker speaks to prince georges police. >> next to the gunman's body, a handgun was found. they also discovered a bag of weapons to include a baseball bat, a machete, a fully loaded semi-automatic handgun and ammunition. the shooter had been suffering from a mental illness. >> university president, wahl wallace l
waves hit us. >> reporter: >> a nasa expert joined us on fox 5 news at 5:00 and said this is extraordinarily rare. >> i have to be honest, will. i am not wear of anything in the history books talking -- not aware of anything in the history books talking about this many people being hurt by a single event. >> ironically the event happened the same day an astroid buzzed by earth closer than an astroid has since scientists started monitoring them 15 years ago. it missed earth by more than 17,000 miles coming closer than weather and communication satellites that orbit our planet. >> they not related. they're going to do more studies, but right now nasa said they don't think it's related. >> so the meteor and astroid just a strange coincidence according to scientists. in case you're wondering as we did, what's the deal with all those dashcams in the cars of average folks like you and me? turns out they're popular in russia for several reasons including disputes over traffic accidents. insurance fraud is apparently a big problem there. we're also looking at how this story f
's surprising is nasa didn't even see it. we'll tell you why, coming up next right here on "world news now." >>> "world news now" weather brought to you by consumer cellular. have given way to sleeping. tossing and turning where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep. and lunesta®(eszopiclone) can help you get there. like it has for so many people before. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. then find out how to get lunesta for as low as fifteen doll
them. so nasa is very good the at finding the much larger ones. but these smaller ones we as humans have not put a lot of effort into it. at the planetary society, we have people that are interested in it and we found this one. >> i want to bring in jason carroll, at the new york museum of natural history. tell us what you're learn building this huge astroid that will get very close to us today. >> well, let me give you some perspective. this meteorite is just about roughly the size of a car, i would say. da-14 which will be swinging by the earth later on this afternoon is about half the size of a football field. so much, much, much larger. and it will be traveling at a rate of about 17,450 miles per hour. that's something like 4.8 miles per second. so it's traveling at an incredible rate. weighs much larger than the meteorite you see behind me here. it will pass by at it closest point about 2:24 p.m. eastern standard time. if you're in indonesia, that is your best vantage point to see. it will be dark there at that particular time. but if you have a telescope, you should be able to
with our telescopes. thanks to australia and nasa we can see imagery coming in from the eastern hemisphere. astronomers worldwide are watching, excited but not too worried. >> this asteroid is half a football field long but roughly the size of a 12 story building like this. and that is big enough to wipe out a city. but scientists say that is not going to happen. the real threat here though, is to communication satellites like the ones we use at fox news. the geosynchronous at 22,000 miles around the earth. at 1:24 eastern this asteroid penetrated the plane. there is no report of a satellite hit. it must exit the plane at 2:24 eastern. but scientists do not expect any collisions to happen. this is not only one out there. they are flying near earth's orbit. astronomers and telescopes around the planet are always looking up. >> we've seen and tracked about 9,000 of them right now. and about a thousand of them are potentially hazardous. so we look at those carefully. it turns out we're safe from those for many hundreds of years. >> the 1908 event in russia which leveled, wiped out forests for
as an asteroid that came exceedingly close to earth, at least in space terms. as this nasa animation shows, the asteroid was just over 17,000 miles away from earth, traveling at about eight miles per second, actually inside a ring of television and weather satellites that surround the planet. named da-14, the asteroid was half the size of a football field. it passed, we can happily report, without incident. here to tell us about both events is astrophysicist and author neil degrasse tyson, director of the hayden planetarium in new york city. let's start with what happened in russia. how unusual was that in terms of size and impact? >> well, we couldn't know precisely how common that would be. all we can do is sort of look back at other sort of reported such events. for example, there was an air blast that happened in the airspace over india and pakistan back in 1990s. which happened to occur while they were in intense conversations about their nuclear buildup of arm ament. and so such a blast mimics greatly what would happened with the nuclear blast. it is an instant deposit of energy in t
that will pass closer than some satellites to the earth. nasa says it is will be the best opportunity ever to witness a near miss but bright sunlight will keep the golden state from seeing it. nasa says there is no need to worry. it will definitely not hit earth. that's good to know. >> 150 meters, that would put a hole in the earth. >> too bad we can't see it. it would be a great show, right, elizabeth. >> yeah. [ laughter ] >> it is. what were you talking about? [ laughter ] >> an asteroid! >> oh, okay. got cla. i have been thinking about fog. i have a foggy brain. >>> it's all over the bay area this morning. you can see it in spots towards the bay bridge toll plaza. we were actually just getting word of an accident now. unfortunately it's on the skyway section sounds like it's on the other side of the bridge westbound 80 by the 101 connector so heads up. we don't have major details now but it sounds like possibly lanes blocked. they also turned on the metering lights. that's why we are starting to see delays in the cash and fastrak lanes and we
of mosquito to about 50%. they say they are not transmitting the west nile virus. >>> nasa will stream the astroid's approach starting 9:00 pacific time. it is the closest to ever get to earth and they say it is the size of the white house. >> that is pretty good moving passed us. >> sal, is traffic moving fast out there? >> it is in many areas, dave and pam, we are looking at 280 north and south and you can go as fast as you legally can, no major problems on the sunole grade and i am not showing you the dense fog, at 5:57, let's go pack to the desk. >>> a deadly shooting on an elementary school campus, what we are learning about the young victim and how he was well- known in the area. >>> luring businesses away? we will tell you more about
. >> it's no small he skprent shows you the destructive nature of the objects. >> what nasa says it was not was part of this asteroid. it buzzed clo to earth today. 100 tons races towards earth every day. national safety counsel estimates you're twice as likely to be struck by lightning than hit by an asteroid but three times more likely than being injured by fire works. 20,000 troops have been sent to help residents. those people are spending a night without windows temperatures in that part of russia are well below zero tonight. >> a giant asteroid talking about has nothing to do with the meteor that hit russia. that one hurled past earth today just before 11:30 our time. astroners used binoculars to watch the point of light speeding across the sky. >> breaking news in antioch. sky 7 caught the scene of what we believe is a shooting in a gas station or perhaps a burger king restaurant near dear valley high school. a person has been handcuffed after the scene. the investigation station has been roped off. the call came in as a shooting at burger king. police have not told fuss a
: how much warning do we get? >> nasa tracks these things. they're able to track 90% of the asteroids that could come close to us. but in this case, there was really no warning. people don't know what's going on. >> brian: i remember in the video game, you could shoot an asteroid out of the sky. i know in armageddon, in the movies, bruce willis and ben affleck were able to -- who else was in that? were able to stop it. is that what we're going to have to do at some point? >> nasa does track these things and they have the capability to stop them before they come close to earth. >> brian: lasers? >> all sorts of things. >> steve: there has been a nasa plan to send some sort of ship onto an asteroid, but once again, the asteroid that's going to come between us and some of our satellites later today, that's going to be far away, right? >> it's relatively close. the closest they've come in centuries. so that's why people are a little nervous. but no, it's not going to hit us. >> alisyn: let us know if there is ever one coming, all right? >> brian: even if we're in sports or in an interview
to be amateur astronomers right now. those people have the most eyes on the sky. even nasa is looking at the skies but in terms of shear numbers, there are lots of people out in their backyards with telescopes looking up at the sky and this -- asteroid that missed us was discovered by amateurs. >> i knew save the world. dave mosier good to see you this morning. thanks for insight. appreciate it unbelievable video high speed police chase horrific ending. car crashing right into the cruiser. whole thing caught on camera. this happens way too much. and then for the first time in almost 600 years the pope has resigned. if you have got a lifelong career, like the pontiff, when is the right time to call it quits? fbn nicole petallides is here to talk about retirement coming up. hey nicole. she will be in here in a second. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. we don't let frequent heartburn
. and the meteorite that crashed into russia, why nasa thought it was bigger and badder than we first thought. >> a flash of light. >> just says after a huge meteorite explodes over russia injuring more than a thousand people there's word of another big fireball, this one streaking above california. trace gallagher live on the west coast with more, trace? >> reporter: they tell us that meteors are rare, but they're whipping around us. this person was driving 280 one of the areas around the bay area, a bright flash of blue light streak across. it's kind of hard to see the color on the video, but witnesses say this thing was a very bright blue and maybe it's just because of what happened in russia that we're watching the skies a little closer, but experts say this likely also could have been a meteor or a meteorite, but there were no reports of it exploding and no reports of it hitting anything, unlike in russia where this thing happened on friday and now, nasa is saying that it was bigger, faster and stronger than they thought instead of 50 feet, it was 55 feet. instead of 33,000 miles per ho
well is the world prepared? nasa budgeted $20 million last year to look for objects that may hit the earth, but scientists say that more money should be spent on detection and ways to avoid possible collision. >> we have gone very good at finding the big things, of kilometre-size objects. there are many more small objects, like these, then there are the big ones. >> i would say the corporate technology to reflect an asteroid could be a nuclear bomb. the key is catching and detecting the obvious early. >> experts say friday's blast could have killed thousands of people had the mir landed in the middle of a large city, all -- a reminder that smaller objects coming into earth's atmosphere should be a wake-up call. >> we know we live in a celestial falling rocks zone. friday reminded us that we live in a shooting gallery. in fact, we got into a cross fire. >> the power of the universe on display here on earth. wbal tv 11 news. >> the sky is falling. it is wild. the maryland turks upset -- terps upset duke, the incredible win had fans charging onto the court. >>, chicken sav buying on
: nasa say this fireball in russia this week is believed to be the largest reporting since 1908. that's when a meteorite hit siberia, destroying an estimated 80 billion of trees. >> so why are all these encounters of a space kind of we're going to talk with jeffrey kluger. >> thanks for having me. >> when you see this coming in a group of threes, you wonder how rare is that? how unusual is it? >> not only is it not unusual but it's exceedingly common. the earth is hit with 100 pieces of debris err day, the size of basketball. every few days like a volkswagen. you should think of our planet as playing in traffic. >> it's disconcerting. >> how come we don't hear about it more often? >> because remember the atmosphere is like a wall of concrete which is why we get beautiful sky shows. it incinerated on the way down due to air friction. the problem is when the rock becoming too big to be consumed earn tirely then it bursts above ground which is call and air burst and that's what creates the technology. >> we hear that they need to shoot things down but don't have i
should watch for fraud. nasa experts say about hundred tons of space debris hit the earth every day but most of the objects are tiny specks. >>> you can take everything you knew about the moon and forget it. scientists have made a stunning discovery. they analyzed monday rocks that the apollo astronauts retrieved and they said the moon had more water than scientists first realized. that could mean the moon was not created by a debris by a planetary collision. how did it form? they north sure. at the very least, it raises many questions. full study is in the journal nature geo science which you probably have their on the night stand. >> whiskey drink ers don't want anybody watering down their booze. the folks at maker's mark learned it the hard way. plus, a high stakes heist in manhattan. how robbers rode off with a fortune in the blink of an eye. "i'm only human" ] humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you q
. a 23-year-old grad student at the university of maryland. a former member of the nasa student ambassador program. >> the family let our detectives know that this suspect had this condition for at least a year. and that in the past he had been prescribed medication for this mental illness. >> reporter: this happened around 1:00 this morning and a rental house close by the college park campus. police say that green set fires in and around the house and in an apparent effort to draw his room mates outside. when the two room mates came out, they say green open eed fi. he killed one, wounded another, then turned the gun on himself. this afternoon dr. wallace lowe, the president of the university of maryland, came to the neighborhood to comfort students who live around here. >> this is a horrific situation. and i just feel terrible about it. >> reporter: what can you tell the students? >> i tell the students we must be strong for each other. that we -- we must watch for each other, and we have to come together at this moment of tragedy and sorrow. >> reporter: now the wounded room m
on march 1. these are brutal cuts to defense, head start, food safety, mental health service, nasa, and small business assistance, and disaster relief. that's just to name a few. the list goes on and on. with the looming deadline. and every american depending on congress to come up with a plan. here is what the republicans did today. congressional members. congressional members took a half day and left capitol hill this afternoon and said we're out of here. congress is in recess for the next ten days and will not address the budget crisis until february 25th. every house democrat and four republicans voted against the recess, and it was obvious leader nancy pelosi was frustrated when a reporter asked just how much more is she willing to compromise. >> i appreciate your question and the good faith in which it has been offered. the republicans are poised to shut down government. the republicans are poised to elect sequestration go forward, which is -- sequestration, you know what that word means? what it means to the american people is unemployment. no jobs. republican party in the c
daryl hannah, and nasa climate scientist james hansen and former chair of the naacp julian bond. the protest was a landmark for the sierra club environmental group after its board endorsed an act of civil disobedience for the first time in its 120-year history. director michael brune was among those arrested. >> so we know we cannot win on climate change if we continue to talk about it but not do anything. so the sierra club is engaging in civil disobedience for the first time because with a moral catastrophe on our hands and need to do what we can to compel stronger, bolder action. >> we will be joined by michael brune and actress daryl hannah after the headlines. president obama as pick for treasury secretary faced questions over his wall street past at a senate confirmation hearing wednesday. jack lew defended the bonus of nearly $1 million he received while working at citigroup just a few months after the bank added taxpayer bailout worth billions. he was also a question of his investment of tens of thousands of dollars in a citigroup fund listed at a building in the cayman
christoforous. >>> we are getting the first look at one of the best photos ever taken of nasa's rover curiosity on mars. it is a self-portrait. and it combines dozens with the hand lens. you can't see because of the position. the picture was taken to document the first rock- drilling activities by curiosity. >> what you can't tell is that curiosity is tum actually there. i'll show -- actually there. i'll show you guys when we come out. it was cool. doing this. >> exactly. like lots of people do with their iphones. ready? let's take a picture. >> here i am. >> you know what? it's never flattering. makes my behind look... >> curious itfeels the same way. >> you know it. >>> a chilling confirmation today from north korea about its long threatened nuclear testing. >>> victims showing both sides of the gun control argument. >>> it is a beautiful day outside, with above-average temperatures. but a new storm system is on the way. don't miss our updated first warning weather forecast. >> wjz is always on. for the top stories on cbsbaltimore.com, in
for them. they're a very nice family. >> reporter: wjz has learned devon green was one of nasa's top interns. an internet biography states he was interested in robotic sciences. green recently graduated in 2012. he was now pursuing his masters at college park. [ dwoking on the -- knocking on the door ] green's family declined to comment for wjz but provided critical information. >> discts learned that the -- detectives learned that the shooter had been suffering from mental illness. detectives let our -- they let our detectives know that he had this condition for the past year and in the past had been prescribed medication for this mental illness. >> like many, they want to know where he got the guns. >> somebody at school, getting shot up. >> and now it's your neighbor involved in it? >> yeah. it's really a shock to me. really is. >> reporter: and we did get some information from state police. as to the source of that gun, we have learned that the handgun found on his possession was actually registered to him legally. he bought it in april 2012
to nasa's jet propulsion laboratory, where they're keeping a close eye on what's going on. >> wolf, we're inside the deep space network operation center at the jet propulsion laboratory at nasa's facility in pasadena, california. it's at the jet propulsion lab, where nasa will be monitoring that asteroid. it's called 2012 da-14, because it was discovered last year. that's an artist rendering of it, but they're going to be looking at the real thing when it passes very close to earth on friday, mid-day. it's going to pass within about 17,200 miles of earth. that's a lot closer than the moon is to the earth. it's also within the satellite ring. about 5,000 miles within the ring of satellites that hover above the earth's surface. what can we really expect from that asteroid has it passes close to earth? i'm here with paul, a research astronomer with nasa's near-earth object program. paul, let's get this out of the way. does this threaten earth? is it going to impact earth? >> no, we've been tracking this closely for a year and we know it will not hit the earth. >> what about the satellites
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